Tag Archives: #inyati safari

Airlink’s city to bush-lodge network now on sale!

Airlink’s city to bush-lodge network now on sale!

Lodge hop ULXAirlink’s “Lodge Link System” service, which will provide direct connectivity beyond the Skukuza and Nelspruit/Kruger airports to five of the most popular game lodge destinations in South Africa, is now available for sale in the Global Distribution System (GDS), on-line, as well as via travel agent and tour operator’s Computerized Reservations Systems. (CRS)

The Lodge Link System will initially connect the safari lodge airstrips located at Arathusa, Londolozi, Sabi Sabi, Singita and Ulusaba with Airlink’s multiple daily scheduled services operating into Skukuza and Nelspruit/Kruger (KMIA) airports.

In conjunction with its franchise partner South African Airways, Airlink’s Lodge Link System flights are now available for purchase worldwide in a single ticket transaction, hosted in the global booking platforms. This will provide the opportunity for enhanced seamless connectivity directly to and from lodges allowing multi carrier, multi sector itineraries to be constructed such as: London to Londolozi; Seattle to Singita; Singapore to Sabi Sabi; Ubatuba to Ulusaba; Athens to Arethusa, to name but a few.

Additionally, the combination of the new Lodge Link System service with Airlink’s regional and domestic flights, which operate between key leisure destinations such as: Cape Town and KMIA, Cape Town and Skukuza, Durban and KMIA, Johannesburg and Skukuza, Johannesburg and KMIA, Johannesburg and Maun, Johannesburg and Kasane, Johannesburg and Vilanculos, KMIA and Livingstone as well as Nelspruit and Vilanculos, will provide travellers to South Africa with unparalleled flexibility and choice when planning their journey’s on that Safari trip of a lifetime.

The new Lodge Link System will serve to complement Airlink’s already established and increasingly popular Cape Town and Johannesburg to Skukuza services. Since the re-opening of Skukuza airport on 2 June 2014, more than 33,000 travellers passed through its doors entrenching Skukuza as a key access point to the world-renowned Kruger National Park Eco leisure destination, and the exclusive Lodges in nearby private game reserves such as Sabi Sand and Timbavati.

Airlink’s Lodge Link System service has been implemented in a number of stages in line with anticipated market demand.

Services between Londolozi and Skukuza; Sabi Sabi and KMIA; together with a connection between Skukuza and Nelspruit airports with onward connections to Livingstone/Zambia as well as Vilanculos/Mozambique will commence operating on 1 July 2015.

Services between Ulusaba and Skukuza and Ulusaba and KMIA will commence on 1 August 2015. Ulusaba is an important air-strip as it provides access to a number of lodges in the area; Ulusaba’s Rock, Cliff and Safari lodges, & Beyond’s Exeter River and Leadwood lodges, Inyati Game Lodge, Leopard Hills, Savanna and Dulini.

llnp-networkAs regards Arathusa and Singita, it is planned that services to these lodges will commence in September 2015. Arathusa is an important node in the north eastern portion of the Sabi Sand reserve and will provide access to the neighboring lodges such as Chitwa Chitwa, Cheetah Plains, Elephant Plains, Simbambili, Nkorho and Djuma Vuyatela

“Airlink is extremely proud to introduce its Lodge Link System service and to have the opportunity to build on the experience gained in re-establishing the Skukuza Airport last year. Skukuza has increased in popularity as a key access point to Southern Africa’s eco-leisure destinations. Seamless direct services ensure that travellers are able to maximize their time in the bush with minimum time spent in airport transits”, said Airlink CEO and Managing director Rodger Foster. He emphasized that the inclusion of KMIA as the significant node in the Lodge Link System network is paramount – “KMIA is an international airport where Airlink offers seven daily flights from JNB as well as daily flights from CPT and DUR and provides additional access to over-border destinations in Zambia and Mozambique. The Lodge Link System enjoys excellent global connectivity at KMIA given frequency and timing of flights and KMIA presents excellent potential for the Lodge Link System to grow”, he added. “Tourism is a key driver of the South African economy and Airlink feels privileged to play a role in developing this to the benefit of all stakeholders”.

Inyati Game Lodge Awarded Tripadvisor Certificate Of Excellence For Five Consecutive Years

Certificate of ExcellenceInyati Game Lodge Awarded Tripadvisor Certificate Of Excellence For Five Consecutive Years

 Inducted into ‘Hall of Fame’ of Five-time Certificate of Excellence Winners on The World’s Largest Travel Site

SABI SAND GAME RESERVE, MPUMALANGA, SOUTH AFRICA – 20th, May, 2015 Inyati Game Lodge today announced that it has been recognised as a TripAdvisor® Certificate of Excellence Hall of Fame winner. The Certificate of Excellence award celebrates excellence in hospitality and is given only to establishments that consistently achieve great traveller reviews on TripAdvisor. The ‘Hall of Fame’ was created to honour those businesses that have earned a Certificate of Excellence for five consecutive years. Winners include accommodations, eateries and attractions located all over the world that have continually delivered a superior customer experience.

“Being awarded the TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence five years in a row and inducted into the ‘Hall of Fame’ is a true source of pride for the entire team at Inyati Game Lodge and we’d like to thank all of our past guests who took the time to complete a review on TripAdvisor,” said Leighanne Dawkins, Marketing Manager at Inyati Game Lodge “There is no greater seal of approval than being recognised by one’s guests. With the TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence based on customer reviews, the accolade is a remarkable vote of confidence to our business and our continued commitment to excellence.”

“Winning the TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence for five consecutive years is a remarkable feat. TripAdvisor is pleased to induct five-time award winners into the ‘Hall of Fame’,” said Marc Charron President, TripAdvisor for Business. “By putting a spotlight on businesses that are focused on consistently delivering great service to customers, TripAdvisor not only helps drive an improvement to hospitality standards around the world, it also gives businesses both large and small the ability to shine and stand out from the competition.”

TripAdvisor hall of fameWhen selecting Certificate of Excellence winners, TripAdvisor uses a proprietary algorithm to determine the honourees that takes into account the quality, quantity and recency of reviews and opinions submitted by travellers on TripAdvisor over a 12-month period as well as business’s tenure and ranking on the Popularity Index on the site. To qualify, a business must maintain an overall TripAdvisor bubble rating of at least four out of five, have a minimum number of reviews and must have been listed on TripAdvisor for at least 12 months.

-ENDS-

2016 Safari Awards Voting is Now Open

2016 Safari Awards Voting is Now Openhttp://www.safariawards.comInyati Game Lodge, Sabi Sand Reserve has been nominated in three categories for the 2016 Safari Awards. Winning an award in these categories is quite an accolade and a feather in our cap. We need your help in voting for us. We could not be where we are today if it weren’t for the support and positive feedback received from our guests.

We have been nominated in the categories are:  “Best Value Safari Property”,“Best Safari Guiding Team“ and”Best Walking Safari”. Please vote for us, we would appreciate the support – and will always continue to improve.

To vote for us, please search for Inyati Game Lodge, Sabi Sand Reserve here: http://www.safariawards.comEllies-crossing

2016 Safari Awards Voting is Now Open

If you have been on a memorable safari holiday, or stayed at what you consider the best safari lodge, you can vote for it now in the 2016 Safari Awards.

The best safari properties in Africa and beyond received over 13,500 votes last year, in categories including Best Value Safari Property, Best Safari Cuisine and Best Safari Guiding Team.

There are 18 categories for the 2016 Awards, including two new categories for Best Location and Best Design. To find out more about the property based categories, please visit our main categories page

To find out more about voting in the Safari Awards, including how to vote for wildlife organisatons and our two special personal contribution awards, please click here.

Stacy’s Story

Stacy’s Story.

Stacy Howell

Returning to change by Matthew Brennan

MatthewI was on my way back from leave. It was the last day of September and close on a month into spring. When I left it was still winter but on this day it was warm into the evening as we expect down in the Lowveld. I therefore had my windows up and my aircon on. Until I reached the entrance into this great game reserve the Sabi Sand Wildtuin, on entry into the reserve I opened all windows and turned the radio off.

Sabi Sand Game Reserve

It was good to be home and the first thing I noticed was the air thick with the smell of smoke. It clings in the spider-webs, it dancers in the dust devils and settles everywhere, sometimes it rains in the scented ash.

My drive to the lodge was uneventful, and I arrived to settle in. I had arrived just at the end of safari and I am quite keen to see my friends and catch up with the news from the last two weeks. So I knew exactly where I needed to go too. Straight to post safari hub of the lodge, the bar. George and Keith are there assisting guests with drinks and good conversation. I notice that most of the guests are updating whichever social medium they choose to broadcast their stories of the African bush. The older generation always scold the youngsters as they order their drinks. I chat a bit with the staff at the bar, but I’m here for bush updates, so I corner the rangers and greet them and get some talk going.

I start it off, “how’s Tlangisa?” I ask George. “Still going strong and both alive”. “you know what I saw the other day?” George questions immediately. “The one Majingilane male with the Othawa’s, cubs and all. ‘Strue!” Keith weighs in, “And have you noticed the Othawa’s have an extra cub?” This is exactly what I have been hoping for an update on the last two weeks. I notice that a few guests have been paying attention to the conversation and so does Keith so he turns the guests to include them in the conversation. “The Othawa’s are one of the prides of lions here, they have three cubs now but it has been two for a very long time and so we are still deliberating as too which pride this extraneous cub originally belongs too. On top of that the Majingilanes are not the father of the cubs and have killed off five of their siblings. So the question now is why not?”

“Xhikave is here in a tree”, says a lady from across the bar. She points in the general area south. “That girl is pregnant,” says Kimmy as he walks guests from their room to the bar. “And there is an elephant on the lawn. Please the barman will help you with a drink.” All the guests shuffle and jostle to the end of the verandah to get a glimpse of the elephant who is preening the Knobthorns in the garden. He moves from lamp post to spotlight coming and going as the shadows hide him from view, he humphs deeply as he moves out of the orange glow and into the river. “There are cheetah everywhere at the moment. We see them every day almost and the wild dogs have come back twice and they have brought there pups. Dam Three and Dewane have been mating as well as Dam Three and Nyeleti.” Keith starts to roll through the scorecard. It makes me anxious to get out there and see for myself. Having got what I needed I retired for the evening. The sooner to bed the sooner I would wake up to get the day started.

I woke with a start as I’m not used to having light in my room in the morning. I could hear the warbling of the bulbuls outside in the trees and the distinct and somber call of the black cuckoo. I notice that it is overcast, I sighed deeply knowing that I was back. I turned my radio onto the game drive channel while I made my way down to the lodge to start my day with a coffee. My radio crackled to life, “I’m leaving Dewane in a tree with a kill,” loosely translated of course. I get my coffee and I am greeted by all the staff welcoming me back from leave. I make myself a cup and take a moment on the verandah and look at the view, it is breath-taking. I then go look for Nelson. I find him cleaning our vehicle. I ask him about his leave and we talk home life for a bit. He knows my enjoyment of the story and so tells me,” John the workshop assistant was picking up staff today and he saw a cheetah kill an impala, we going to go this afternoon.” He states forthright. “Ok.” Is all I can say against such determination. Nelson also states that there is buffalo in the south at least a thousand he says.

I then move off to prepare for safari and get my equipment clean and working and start to focus on the guests that will be coming in. So by 15h30 when it is high tea I am ready to explode onto the scene. I greet the guests and chat for a bit, I find out what they are expecting from their stay here. I then inform them of how things will work and such and as soon as possible I usher them to the vehicle. There they climb on and I instruct them as to how to remain safe and then. I start up the car and off we go.

Matthew and Nelson
Matthew and Nelson

Safari Awards 2015 Finalists Announced

The votes have been counted and the results are in. You will find a full list of all 2015 finalists here. At the Judges Conference in London on 12th September Inyati Game Lodge was selected as a Safari Awards Finalist in one or more categories. The overall Africa results will be released at WTM on Sunday night, 2nd November 2015

Inyati Game Lodge – 2015 Finalist Best Safari Guiding Team

Wildlife is a huge part of going on safari, so its crucial to have expert guides who can get you as close to the action as possible. This category rates the guides at the lodges guests stayed at.

Some of the voting questions: How effectively did your guides communicates with you? Did you feel you learned a lot? Were you inspired?

 Best Safari Guiding Team

Inyati Game Lodge – 2015 Finalist Best Walking Safari

Walking safaris are a great way to view things from a different perspective to the typical game drive on four wheels. If you had the opportunity to go on a walking safari, let us know what you thought of it.

Best Walking Safari

About

Over 4,000 vetted tour operators, travel agents and travel journalists are invited to vote to support their favourite safari properties and conservation organisations. Nominees then contact their guests and followers to ask for their support in voting for them. A finalist list is formed based on numbers which is reviewed by the Judges (independent operators) and the results are produced. The process is entirely independent, transparent and supported by the trade. All The Safari Awards Judges have been nominated by the previous years awards winners and finalists and are unquestionably the most highly-respected, knowledgeable independent tour operators selling safaris. The judges sit at the head of the Good Safari Guide, ensuring that the lodges, camps and operations presented both in the guides and in the Awards really are the best in Africa and worldwide. With nominations from over a thousand luxury travel professionals, hundreds of readers of Conde Nast Traveller, Tatler, Brides and Travel Africa Magazine you can rest assured that any safari operation nominated for a Safari Award is amongst the best in its genre. Finalists are amongst the top 3% not just in Africa but worldwide, and the Safari Award Winners are unquestionably the best, their reputation earned through excellence recognised by independent industry experts. View  Good Safari GuideSafari Awards 2015 Finalists Announced

If Rhinos Go Extinct

Fight for Rhinos

To every thing there is a yin and yang, a balance. The web of all species is intricately connected, each relies on the others.

When we let a species go extinct, we upset the balance. So if we fail the rhino, what will happen to the rest of the savanna?

Rhinos are mega-herbivores, the lawn maintenance crew of the savanna. Their job to the ecosystem is to carve out paths for other creatures (eating), make water holes (digging), and to help germinate plants (defecating).

rhinos eating grass

It may seem simplistic, but they are the only sizable creatures in this habitat to do it. The other mega-herbivores, elephants affect different parts of the savanna, as they eat from a different menu, browsing on taller bushes and trees.

Rhinos eat an average of 23.6 kg during the course of each day. The dung piles they share can be 5 metres wide and 1 metre deep. That’s a sizable…

View original post 289 more words

Ranger Diaries – Khaki Fever

Khaki Fever

Khimbini Hlongwane from Inyati Game Reserve in the Sabi Sand was captivated by animals from an early age.

“Growing up in a village in the eastern Transvaal (now Mpumalanga) got me exposed to wildlife from a young age and I was fascinated by the behaviours of various animals,” he says. “I loved being out there with brothers herding cattle and goats while interacting with wildlife. It was really fun, yet challenging, because every day we had to try to find food with without becoming food!”

Hlongwane says he battled when he grew older and had to divide his days between going to school and spending time having fun outdoors.

When his community was separated from wildlife, he knew he had to find a way back to live closer to and learn more about animals. However, guiding wasn’t his first choice. “I was terrified of being responsible for entertaining people of different cultures, coming from all corners of the globe,” he says. “You have to understand why that was a challenge for me – I was raised by people who couldn’t read and write, never left the Transvaal and hardly had any exposure to the outside world.”

Initially, Hlongwane had his sights set on becoming a wildlife veterinarian but says after graduating from high school, it was clear this wasn’t going to happen. He moved on to plan B and started as a tracker at Inyati Game Lodge in 1994.

“The training went smoothly because the man training me happened to the same man who taught me the ins and outs of surviving in the bush as a herd boy, Simon George Hlongwane, an older brother, a friend, a mentor, a custodian and a role model to many of us in the community.”Khimbini

Changing t(r)ack

“One of the first things Simon told me was: ‘Remember, we used to see lion tracks and we would herd the livestock in the opposite direction to protect them? Now when we see lion tracks, we follow until we find the lions, so be more vigilant!’”

Hlongwane spent five years as a tracker before becoming a ranger. “I enjoyed the sense of accomplishment I got when seeing the astonishment and excitement on my guests’ faces after successfully tracking a leopard where it seemed impossible.”

He didn’t think he would like guiding as much as he did tracking but Hlongwane says, 15 years later he’s still loving it and has found a new passion in the form of wildlife photography.

Khimbini photography
Khimbini ‘s picture of the leopard stalking was featured in the National Geographic top 25 wilderness photographs.

Close call

While he has had a few close calls with wild animals, the incident that stands out involves guests. “One of the biggest fears as guide is losing a guest,” he says.

One afternoon, after tracking for about half an hour, Hlongwane found a pride of four lionesses and 10 cubs. Because the lions were still resting, he continued the drive and returned to the pride at dusk.

“As we arrived, the lions started yawning, indicating that they would soon start moving. We followed the lions and, as we negotiated our way through the bushes, it became difficult to keep up. I was focused on keeping an eye on the movement of the lions while warning guests to mind the branches coming their way.

“All of a sudden there were loud screams behind me in the vehicle. I turned around to find that, of the party of six Germans, only four were left in the vehicle. Two were standing on the seats, two were on the bars we used to embark the vehicle and the other two had jumped out of the vehicle.”

Hlongwane stopped the engine, picked up his rifle and hopped out the vehicle.

“Trying to figure out what was going on was difficult. Even though we had all been speaking English earlier, suddenly the guests were only speaking German. In the midst of the shouting I heard the word ‘schlange’ which sounded like the Afrikaans word ‘slang’, meaning snake.

“With the tracker watching the lions I decided to open the tailgate of the vehicle. Sure enough there was a harmless variegated bush snake underneath the seats.”

Tree-scaling impala

Hlongwane reckons he could fill a book with the strange questions some guests ask. One of his favourites was at a leopard sighting.

“We followed drag marks and found a leopard in jackalberry tree. Beside the leopard was a half-eaten impala carcass. It was the guests’ first leopard sighting so I waited for the excitement to die down a bit before talking more about leopards.”

“The guest sitting at the back asked: ‘What was the impala doing up there in the first place?’ I turned to look at my tracker and before I could answer she hit me with another: ‘Is the impala dead?’.”

Hlongwane politely explained that impala don’t climb trees and it had been dragged up the tree by the leopard.

Khim photoDon’t stop learning

The most valuable lesson Hlongwane has learnt is to never allow yourself to think you know everything, because that will be the day you stop learning. “Especially in wildlife there is so much to learn. Animals continue to prove to us that they don’t live by the theories we write about them.”

http://tourismupdate.co.za/Contents/Editions/2014/June2014/Ranger_Diaries.html

 

September 2012 Wildlife Journal

SpringThe month of September brought with it rising temperatures and serious dry season conditions for the wildlife to contend with. With most of the surface water drying up, the wildlife has been forced to congregate in huge numbers along the sand river and dams. However the first rainstorm of the season also came along towards the end of the month, and brought some relief to the dry vegetation in the area. The temperatures have been fluctuating between 38 and 45°C, making the swimming pool very popular. Spring is a time of change and strong contrasts between the dry barren months and summer’s new beginnings.

The landscape has begun blossoming into life, with a number of trees bursting with colour.

The game has been exploding out of the bush this month and the guides have been notching up some incredible sightings of lion, leopard, elephants and wild dog. Our general game viewing with large herds sighted regularly, was fantastic.

Leopard (Panthera pardus)

The animals in the Sabi Sand Reserve are named after their territories. The predators have been given names and the guides and trackers know the animals according to the names they have given them.

Dayone male

Dayone maleThis male leopard provided most of our leopard viewing of the month. Dayone was very active patrolling his territory covering the entire length of the area. One afternoon we watched him licking, rubbing his face and body on a old buffalo skull. Leopards and lion often do this possible to disguise their smell for hunting purposes. He was seen a day latter lying on an old termites mound, where he waited for few hours for warthogs to come out, this time his trick didn’t work, the hogs stayed in termites mound until he left.

Dayone male chilling

Dayone male snarling

Khashane male

The enormous Khashane male leopard had a hard time this month; he is carrying few battle wounds clearly indicating that he was faced with formidable challenger who was determined to take over the territory. If he is looking this badly injured yet still won the fight since is still in his territory I would loved to see the state the other male is in. He also had close call with lionesses where he had to retreat into safety of a tree on two occasions during the month of this report.

Khashane male

Hlabankunzi female

Exciting news: Hlabankunzi femaleHlabankunzi female dropped; we only just heard not seen them yet so we not sure how many in a litter. She is keeping them in exclusive den site and were keeping clear of the area were think she have them hidden just to give them time until she ready to let them out for us to see. We will certainly keep you posted.

We were fortunate to follow her in one of her hunting outings, she killed and impala fed on it for a day and half before losing it to a passing hyena, she should have put it up a tree.

Xikhavi female

She have recovered well from her battle wounds really looking her best now. Xikhavi tried to mate with Dayone male a few times this month but he was being himself again playing hard to get, he just kept walking away, ignoring her. She had to follow him completely out of her territory putting herself in danger with the other females for nothing as her never mated with her; hopefully he will give in soon.

Xikhavi female

Xikhavi female close up

Dam3 female

This female continues to surprise us with her changing behaviour, becoming more and more relaxed and tolerant of vehicles. We had some great viewing of her this month even manage to follow her while hunting, a clear indication she is more habituated to vehicles now, really good to see after many years of us trying to get her to accept our presence.

There were two new male leopards seen this month in our section of the reserve, we located a very-very elderly male who is believed to have come from the North-Eastern Sabi Sand. Another male was seen briefly at Sand River, he got himself pinned between two Buffalo bulls and the Sand River. The Buffalo held their line and pushed the leopard toward the river, the leopard then bisected the buffalo bolting past both their noses in a yellow flash.

Rock and hard place

Lion (Panthera leo)

Lion (Panthera leo)Selati coalition and Ximhungwe pride

The Selati males and Ximhungwe lionesses have been very active giving great sightings throughout the month. The males are now starting to look like pride males as their girth and confidence improve. The four males killed three buffalos this month of which one was only couple of kilometres from the lodge.

Selati maleOne of the interesting things worth mentioning is that Majingelane male coalition had a few visits into area, keeping the Selati males on their toes. The larger male of Selati coalition of lions were seen running past the front of the lodge while roaring , one morning, upon close observation we noticed fresh, bleeding battle wounds, we latter received reports of two Majingelane males and one Othawa lioness were in the area he came running from. On the following drive we located one of the other males (one with bad limp) of the Selati male coalition with battle wounds.

There was also a 6 days of mating, copulating every 15 minutes between Selati male lion and Ximhungwe lioness, at the end of day 5 both lions appeared to be totally exhausted.

Ximhungwe prideWe followed Ximhungwe pride out on their hunt on one evening, they made few attempt hunting waterbucks but when we left they still hadn’t killed anything but the night was still young there was hope they could get something to eat. It was only two days later that we found them on a buffalo carcass and they were later joined by the four Selati males who helped to finish off the carcass.

The four Ximhungwe lionesses also managed to kill a zebra towards the end of the month which they fed on for couple of days; they successfully kept it safe from the Selati males.

Selati males

Ximhungwe lionesses

Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

Elephant (Loxodonta africana)There is an abundance of elephant around at the moment and it is not uncommon to see 4 to 5 different breeding herds on a game drive, predominantly along the Sand River. On one afternoon were came across an elephant cow with unusual tusk formation, the tusks have grown across each other making it hard for her to use in feeding.

“A battle of the giants” we witnessed two bull elephant fighting, it started as play fight as they testing each other strength but then one hit hard the other bull responded by stabbing harder with his tusk then it was a war that left us very dusty. The battle ended when one bull turn and run for his life with the other one chasing him.

Elephant dusting battle

Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

The large herds of buffalo spent most of the month on our traversing area not without the lion harassing them. The lion and buffalo interactions have left guests in absolute awe of the cycle of life in nature.

The eternal battle between buffalo and lion is a spectacle in itself – but to witness an active hunt and to see the final take down and kill is a rare and special sight.

Inyati Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer)More than the big five…..

HyenaWith the great hunting success of the lion prides, our hyenas have also been having a good time, many free meals left lying around. We have been fortunate to locate a hyena den site with two little cubs and few adults.

After feeding on a smelly, rotting buffalo carcass, this hyena needed to take a dip in a dam.

Hyena swimmingThe general game sightings have also been fantastic; due to the waning water supplies, much activity takes place along the Sand river, which has been the focus of our activities this month.

A lone male wild dog came running into our property, he was very relaxed , hunting successfully on his own and hardly called or searched for the rest of the pack which will suggest that maybe his been separated for long time and has gotten used to being on his own.

Wild dog

Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

There is a sub-adult male hippo who was kicked from herd by the dominant male, he now lives alone at our causeway . He has become very active and entertaining lately with a display of all sorts stunts , giving us a good show as we cross the causeway.

HippoIn and around camp

Kudu femaleElephants, leopard, buffaloes, impalas warthogs visited us in the lodge during the month. Most of the predators’ visits, happen at night but one of our early morning tea was interrupted by the three of the Selati male lions who came walk across our lawn searching for buffaloes that had spent the night in the lodge.

Rolling lawn
That’s all from us this month, we thank you for spending few moments with us in the wilderness, shared our experiences and joined our adventures, and we are committed to keep you updated.